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Fabrication of Shaped Diamond Thin Films with Smooth Surfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109095D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anschel, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for achieving diamond films of varied shapes with one side having a smooth surface. Polycrystalline diamond thin films can be deposited on various substrates, Si wafers, Mo, W, and even on C films, to name a few (*). Being crystalline and having a finite grain size, the deposited surface of such films are rough due to faceting. The roughness is rarely much less than 1 micron. However, when films of thickness sufficient to be self-supporting are deposited on a highly polished smooth substrate, that interface is much smoother than the deposited surface. It is proposed to take advantage of this to form diamond films on suitably shaped smooth substrates which can be etched off after the diamond deposition. Diamond is generally chemically inert so there is a wide selection of substrate materials.

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Fabrication of Shaped Diamond Thin Films with Smooth Surfaces

       Disclosed is a method for achieving diamond films of
varied shapes with one side having a smooth surface.  Polycrystalline
diamond thin films can be deposited on various substrates, Si wafers,
Mo, W, and even on C films, to name a few (*).  Being crystalline and
having a finite grain size, the deposited surface of such films are
rough due to faceting.  The roughness is rarely much less than 1
micron.  However, when films of thickness sufficient to be
self-supporting are deposited on a highly polished smooth substrate,
that interface is much smoother than the deposited surface.  It is
proposed to take advantage of this to form diamond films on suitably
shaped smooth substrates which can be etched off after the diamond
deposition.  Diamond is generally chemically inert so there is a wide
selection of substrate materials.  Si, Mo, W and other substrates can
be etched away by conventional dry or wet processes.

      This approach also has another possible advantage.  Generally,
the diamond film deposition is carried out at temperatures of about
600- 900~C which is quite high.  By depositing the film on a
substrate that is subsequently etched, it can be bonded on a final
piece which may not have been able to withstand the high temperature
process.  Effects of differential thermal expansion is also avoided.
The very low coefficient of friction  and wear rate of diamond is
well known in tribo...