Browse Prior Art Database

Flexible Micro Electrical Transmission Line

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109165D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cronin, JE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

To transmit power to and electrical signals to and from micro-machines, a flexible electrical transmission line is constructed which allows some motion of a connected micro-machine. A process is described to make a serpentine line or structure comprised of a group of conductors covered by inorganic insulator material. Each end of the serpentine structure remains solidly attached to an inorganic insulating substrate, but free of attachment for most of its length. Later attachment of this "micro-extension cord" to a micro-machine at one end and to power supply and signal lines at the other end may be done by any of several conventional methods.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 61% of the total text.

Flexible Micro Electrical Transmission Line

       To transmit power to and electrical signals to and from
micro-machines, a flexible electrical transmission line is
constructed which allows some motion of a connected micro-machine.  A
process is described to make a serpentine line or structure comprised
of a group of conductors covered by inorganic insulator material.
Each end of the serpentine structure remains solidly attached to an
inorganic insulating substrate, but free of attachment for most of
its length.  Later attachment of this "micro-extension cord" to a
micro-machine at one end and to power supply and signal lines at the
other end may be done by any of several conventional methods.

      Referring to Fig. 1, a rectangular trench is etched in
inorganic insulating substrate 4 and is filled with organic insulator
2 and planarized by methods conventional in the semiconductor
industry.  Photomasking and etching is used to form very small
trenches in regions 6 and 8.  Then, an inorganic insulator 10 is
conformally deposited.  Conductor 12 is deposited and planarization
is performed to remove both layers 10 and 12 from uppermost
horizontal surfaces leaving the cross-section shown in Fig. 1.

      Referring to Fig. 2, metal 12 is etched back and replaced with
a top cover of additional inorganic insulator 10.  After
planarization, photoresist mask 14 is defined.  Next, recesses are
etched into organic 2.  Much or all of photoresist 14 is consumed
...