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Browse Prior Art Database

Intelligent Flexible Connector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109178D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 154K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Coteus, PW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In an upgradable multiprocessor computer, processors are connected together with dedicated electronics and high bandwidth connectors. This invention combines the dedicated electronics and the connectors into a compact, high speed, high bandwidth pluggable connector.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Intelligent Flexible Connector

       In an upgradable multiprocessor computer, processors are
connected together with dedicated electronics and high bandwidth
connectors.  This invention combines the dedicated electronics and
the connectors into a compact, high speed, high bandwidth pluggable
connector.

      In upgradable multiprocessor computers, the processors are
connected together with dedicated electronics and cables which allow
for high speed communication between the processors.  This is usually
accomplished by placing the communication electronics on the same
board as the processor, and joining the processor boards together
with high I/O flexible cables.  The problem is that the electronics
must be present even in the case of a single processor, adding cost.
Further, the usual means of attaching cables, i.e., as a right-angled
connection into the board, adds cable length, and hence delay.  Rigid
connectors, such as a jumpered module which only serves as a
connector, do not allow for shock and vibration isolation between the
backpanels and require tight tolerance controls.  Lastly, the
communication from one processor to the other must always go through
at least two separate communication chips, one on each side of the
cable, adding further delay.  This usual configuration is shown in
Fig. 1.  Here a sixteen-way processor is formed by interconnecting
four multiprocessor boards, each with four processors.  The board to
board  communication is through communications modules joined by flex
cables.

      Fig. 2 shows a solution to this connection problem.  What is
shown are the same 4 boards in Fig. 1, but this time flex cables and
4 sets of communication electronics have been replaced by a single
multichip carrier, centered on the intersection of the 4 boards, and
connected to them via flex cables.  The connection of the cables to
the boards is through gold pad on pad connections, and is field
serviceable.  The fle...