Browse Prior Art Database

MOS Structures in III-V Compounds by Low Temperature Oxidation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109379D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Iyer, SS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This invention describes a technique for the formation of low interface state density silicon dioxide-semiconductor interface by low temperature oxidation. The technique should be useful in obtaining low recombination and MOSFET structures in compound semiconductors.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 64% of the total text.

MOS Structures in III-V Compounds by Low Temperature Oxidation

       This invention describes a technique for the formation of
low interface state density silicon dioxide-semiconductor interface
by low temperature oxidation.  The technique should be useful in
obtaining low recombination and MOSFET structures in compound
semiconductors.

      Compared to single crystal silicon, amorphous silicon exhibits
rapid oxidation at lower temperatures by dry oxidation.  Dry
oxidation is a preferred technique in formation of MOS structures in
silicon since it leads to low interface states and bulk traps, and
high reliability.  Dry oxidation of single crystal silicon is
accomplished at high temperatures (nearly 1000~C) that are unsuitable
for use with III-V compounds  such as GaAs.  Amorphous silicon,
however, can be oxidized at significantly lower temperatures,
allowing for compatibility with III-V structures.

      In this invention, we disclose the use of dry oxidation of a
structure consisting of an amorphous silicon layer deposited on a
III-V compound with an intervening layer of pseudomorphic silicon of
a few monolayer in thickness. Thus, the structure being oxidized
consists of an amorphous layer of silicon on top, a few monolayers of
silicon in between, and a III-V structure at the bottom.  The
structures can be grown in epitaxial systems which allow low
interface states between the thin single crystal pseudomorphic
silicon grown on the III-V semiconductor....