Browse Prior Art Database

Expandable Targets for Efficient Selection via a Screen Cursor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109411D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 297K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jarrell, NF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an interactive user interface program that varies the size of individual targets on the computer screen in response to the cursor path. The targets on the computer screen are divided into segments. The path of a cursor moving away from a reference point on the screen is tracked. As the cursor reaches a segment, the targets in that segment are expanded by the user interface program.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 61% of the total text.

Expandable Targets for Efficient Selection via a Screen Cursor

       Disclosed is an interactive user interface program that
varies the size of individual targets on the computer screen in
response to the cursor path.  The targets on the computer screen are
divided into segments.  The path of a cursor moving away from a
reference point on the screen is tracked.  As the cursor reaches a
segment, the targets in that segment are expanded by the user
interface program.

      In a typical embodiment the targets represent actions that can
be taken in a computer application, and are hence analogous to menu
items.  The targets are located in concentric circles on the computer
screen with the cursor initially placed in the center.  In addition,
there is a circle about the same center at some predefined distance
within the circle of targets.  These concentric circles are divided
into sectors.  When the cursor reaches the inner circle, the targets
that lie within the sector occupied by the cursor are expanded.  The
final target size is large enough for the user 1) to distinguish the
text or icon that labels it, and 2) to successfully select the
target.  When the cursor crosses back over the inner circle the
expanded targets are restored to their original size.

      Fig. 1 shows the initial screen configuration when the targets
are uniformly sized and the cursor is within the inner circle.  In
Fig. 2 the cursor has crossed the inner circle on a path toward a
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