Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Combining Icons to Display Conceptual Relation of Composed Objects

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109426D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

James, WS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Many graphical user interface applications involve objects which are composed of multiple sub-objects. There is often confusion concerning the relationship of these objects to their subobjects. For example, a user account object may be a simple relationship formed between three sub-objects such as a principal, group, and organization, or a document may contain text, data from a spreadsheet, and a voice comment. This disclosure defines a method of conceptually combining the icons of multiple sub-objects to more appropriately convey the composed object.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 62% of the total text.

Combining Icons to Display Conceptual Relation of Composed Objects

      Many graphical user interface applications involve objects
which are composed of multiple sub-objects.  There is often confusion
concerning the relationship of these objects to their subobjects.
For example, a user account object may be a simple relationship
formed between three sub-objects such as a principal, group, and
organization, or a document may contain text, data from a
spreadsheet, and a voice comment.  This disclosure defines a method
of conceptually combining the icons of multiple sub-objects to more
appropriately convey the composed object.

      A single icon is designed for each sub-object that comprises
the composed object.  An icon is then formed for the composed object
by combining the individual sub-object icons into a single new icon.
This eliminates the need to design a completely new icon for the
composed object which may be misleading or unclear to the user.  This
single icon, formed by combining the individual icons or its
sub-objects, may also show the relationships between the sub-objects,
for example, by connecting them with graphical links.  This
combination of icons eliminates the need for a user to develop a new
conceptual model and associate its visual representation to the
composed object, since the new icon is a combination of familiar
objects.  In addition, the combined icon can display more information
if the names or other identifying information are s...