Browse Prior Art Database

Audible Means to Allow Blind User to Manipulate Icons

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109433D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McKiel, FA: AUTHOR

Abstract

In the context of using audible feedback to allow a blind user to work with a window-based graphical user interface (GUI), special combinations of sounds make it possible to locate, move and place iconic representations on the display and to place one icon onto another to accomplish an implied function (drag & drop).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 68% of the total text.

Audible Means to Allow Blind User to Manipulate Icons

      In the context of using audible feedback to allow a blind user
to work with a window-based graphical user interface (GUI), special
combinations of sounds make it possible to locate, move and place
iconic representations on the display and to place one icon onto
another to accomplish an implied function (drag & drop).

      As a foundation for the present specific invention, the
audible-cursor is assumed to handle icons in the following manner:
Icons residing in the client area of a window each have an associated
pre-recorded or similar announcement which declares the type and
contents of the icon.  For example, a file cabinet icon which
contains tax records will audibly signify when the pointer is upon it
by making the sound of a file drawer opening followed by the verbal
utterance "tax records".  It is common practice in a GUI to perform
direct manipulation of icons, or so-called "drag-and-drop".  This is
done by pointing to an icon, effectively "grabbing" that icon by, for
instance, pressing and holding a button on a mouse, then moving the
icon or a copy of it around on the display in the same manner as
one would move the system pointer.  In some applications, one icon
may be dragged in this manner and be released while positioned upon
another icon.  This graphical input may evoke some implied action.
For example, moving a letter envelope icon onto a printer icon and
releasing it may cause the compu...