Browse Prior Art Database

Electronic Book

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109497D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 128K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Winstead, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

This idea encompasses the technologies needed to package, develop, and manufacture an electronic book. The electronic book will offer the convenience of conventional paper books as well as graphics/animation, extremely high density storage of text, graphics, and sound information on a "compact disc" (CD), indefinite useful life, interactive capabilities, high fidelity sound playback, simplified writing, publishing, and distribution, and potential stylus/tablet options for editing, notes, etc. Both municipal and private libraries will benefit from the increased storage density (less space required) and longer life.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Electronic Book

       This idea encompasses the technologies needed to package,
develop, and manufacture an electronic book.  The electronic book
will offer the convenience of conventional paper books as well as
graphics/animation, extremely high density storage of text, graphics,
and sound information on a "compact disc" (CD), indefinite useful
life, interactive capabilities, high fidelity sound playback,
simplified writing, publishing, and distribution, and potential
stylus/tablet options for editing, notes, etc.  Both municipal and
private libraries will benefit from the increased storage density
(less space required) and longer life.

      As described in this article, the electronic book attempts to
retain the "comfort" and "feel" of conventional paper books.  Thus,
user familiarity is instantaneous and training negligible.  No great
physiological adjustment is necessary; thus acceptance will be very
quick and enthusiastic.

      Referring to Fig. A, the electronic book is made up of some
basic subassemblies:
      1)  The front and back covers (made to resemble conventional
books in both size and feel/texture).
      2)  The CD device - based on optical "compact disc" technology
and capable of containing text, graphics, and sound information all
encoded/written onto and read from the CD device.
      3)  The text display device - an LCD display screen which also
forms a cover to the electronics/CD devices.  The text display must
also provide enough contrast for ease of reading in normal lighted
rooms.
      4)  The battery - which enables portability and independence
from external electricity for a reasonable time (rechargeable).
      5)  The graphics display - an LCD (color) screen very similar
to the small portable color LCD televisions now available.
      6)...