Browse Prior Art Database

Enhanced Calculator Function on the Display Terminal

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109514D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Inagaki, T: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a calculator function on the display terminal, attached to the host computer, which enables an operator to do arithmetic calculations between the numeric data displayed on the screen and put the results of the calculations on the screen automatically. This function handles the data on the screen directly, so it does not depend on the host application program and its data format.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 69% of the total text.

Enhanced Calculator Function on the Display Terminal

       Disclosed is a calculator function on the display
terminal, attached to the host computer, which enables an operator to
do arithmetic calculations between the numeric data displayed on the
screen and put the results of the calculations on the screen
automatically.  This function handles the data on the screen
directly, so it does not depend on the host application program and
its data format.

      The host computer sends the data to the display terminal, and
this data is stored into a certain area of memory buffer of the
display terminal. (See Figure 1.) The calculator accesses this memory
buffer directly for calculation and writes a result of calculation in
the specified answer area.

      The first step of this procedure is to specify the numeric data
locations on the screen for later use.  For example, some symbols
(#1, #2, #3, etc.) are used for this purpose.  In other words, each
name has a close linkage to the numeric data field on the screen and
the corresponding memory buffer.  The locations on the screen can be
specified by use of any pointing device; for example, mouse, touch
panel, light pen, etc. (See Figure 2).

      The second step is to make instructions.  For example, an
instruction "#1 + #2 = #3" means that "Read the numeric data from the
memory #1 defined by the first step and read the next data from #2
and then store an answer of '#1 + #2' into the memory buffer
indicate...