Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic, Interactive Show SQL Window

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109521D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Banning, KR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Structured Query Language (SQL) queries are difficult to formulate by the inexperienced user. The command language is difficult to master with its syntax, specific order of clauses and structure. In today's environment with graphical user interfaces it is possible to develop a visual user interface to simplify the development of queries for the novice user. While this visual user interface makes it much simpler to develop queries, there still exists the need to master the SQL language. In addition, it would be useful to be able to edit the SQL statement while it is being displayed.

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Dynamic, Interactive Show SQL Window

       Structured Query Language (SQL) queries are difficult to
formulate by the inexperienced user. The command language is
difficult to master with its syntax, specific order of clauses and
structure.  In today's environment with graphical user interfaces it
is possible to develop a visual user interface to simplify the
development of queries for the novice user.  While this visual user
interface makes it much simpler to develop queries, there still
exists the need to master the SQL language.  In addition, it would be
useful to be able to edit the SQL statement while it is being
displayed.

      Disclosed is a Show SQL window.  This window allows the user to
see the simultaneous display of both the visual representation of the
query in the graphical user interface, as well as the SQL statement
that is being developed by the system.

      This article documents a method to provide the user of a visual
query system the ability to display a Show SQL window.  When
requested by the user, the Show SQL window is displayed
simultaneously with the underlying windows which display the contents
of the visual query under formulation.  The window is formatted to
distinguish the different clauses of the SQL statement.  In addition
to being able to view the SQL statement, the user is given the
ability to directly edit the statement in the window.  Changes are
then reflected in the visual query windows as appropriate and vice
versa as changes are made in the visual query user interface.

      Prior implementations of this type of learning aid can be found
in programs such as the IBM OS/2* Extended Edition Query Manager
product.  However, that implementation does not give the use...