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Language Processing Language Token Group Definition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109553D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hidalgo, DS: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a feature of the LANGUAGE PROCESSING LANGUAGE (LPL) that provides an abstracted means by which the input token matching done during parsing by a translator built with LPL can be designed to be performed using a faster algorithm when the matching is done against a number of predefined symbols. The LPL user defines a group of symbols that are to be matched this way using the syntactic facility provided. The LPL translator generates a function that specifically checks for an input token being part of the group. The name of this function is the name of the group and the LPL user may then use this name anywhere in the syntax definition of the language in place of the list of symbols.

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Language Processing Language Token Group Definition

       Disclosed is a feature of the LANGUAGE PROCESSING
LANGUAGE (LPL) that provides an abstracted means by which the input
token matching done during parsing by a translator built with LPL can
be designed to be performed using a faster algorithm when the
matching is done against a number of predefined symbols.  The LPL
user defines a group of symbols that are to be matched this way using
the syntactic facility provided.  The LPL translator generates a
function that specifically checks for an input token being part of
the group.  The name of this function is the name of the group and
the LPL user may then use this name anywhere in the syntax definition
of the language in place of the list of symbols.

      One very important concern of language translator design is the
runtime performance of the translator, that is the amount of time
that it takes the translator to produce its output from a given
input.  This is a concern whether or not a mechanically processable
design language is used to implement the translator.  However,
because the designer has less control over the output mechanically
produced from a design language the performance concern is even
greater. One aspect of language translation that influences
performance greatly is syntax parser design.  Moreover, the symbol
matching strategy used by the parser usually has great impact on
performance.  The problem is then how to allow the input languag...