Browse Prior Art Database

High Temperature Ductility Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109569D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 100K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Darekar, VS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is an instrument developed to measure the ductility of metal foils at elevated temperatures as well as at room temperature.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

High Temperature Ductility Tester

       Disclosed is an instrument developed to measure the
ductility of metal foils at elevated temperatures as well as at room
temperature.

      The need for such an instrument was long felt as many of the
circuit elements have to withstand high strains due to elevated
temperatures encountered in the manufacturing and in the service.
Furthermore, the fact that certain metals (like plated copper)
display lower ductility at specific range of temperature makes it
impossible to predict the performance of circuit elements at high
temperatures from room temperature data.  Measurement of ductility by
conventional ASTM tension test requires elaborate sample preparation
and is time consuming.  Some simple and quick tester was a necessity
and this tester serves the purpose.

      The figure illustrates the construction and the operation of
this instrument which uses the principle of cupping test.  It
comprises three major components: 1) Heating chamber 2) Microscope or
CCTV and 3) Digital micrometer with motor drive.  The heating chamber
accommodates heating elements powered through temperature controller
maintaining the desired temperature from room to 400oC.  It also
contains washer-type serrated grips with 1/4" diameter opening to
hold tight the foil sample.  On one side there is an opening to allow
a steel ball penetrator attached to the spindle of micrometer to move
towards the gripped foil sample.  On the opposite side, there is a
viewing window covered with glass to observe the fracturing of the
foil surface through the microscope.  The...