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Browse Prior Art Database

Adaptive Feed Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109577D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 5 page(s) / 233K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fischer, L: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes an adaptive feed method for removing documents or bank notes from a stack. The stack is supported on a lift plate and a feed belt removes the documents or notes from the top of the stack. The lift and removal speeds are adapted to each other for long-and short-range error correction. In the latter case, following an error, the actual values of the two speeds are reduced in steps down to permissible minimum values. After several tries, the original speed values are restored.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Adaptive Feed Method

       This article describes an adaptive feed method for
removing documents or bank notes from a stack.  The stack is
supported on a lift plate and a feed belt removes the documents or
notes from the top of the stack.  The lift and removal speeds are
adapted to each other for long-and short-range error correction.  In
the latter case, following an error, the actual values of the two
speeds are reduced in steps down to permissible minimum values.
After several tries, the original speed values are restored.

      The typical design of the feed mechanism with the note stack 3
on the lift plate 4 is shown in the figure.  Driven by a DC or
stepper lift motor 5 through a threaded spindle 6, the entire note
stack is moved upward towards feed belt 2.  During this, the normal
or frictional force between the rotating feed belt and the top-most
note in the stack increases until it is sufficient for removing the
top-most note.  The removal characteristics are improved by the feed
belt performing an oscillating movement through an eccentric roller
1.  Each note thus removed is detected by an optical sensor 7 which
determines the number of notes as well as their width and the spacing
between them.  After the required number of notes has been removed
and detected by sensor 7, the lift motor is switched off and the
movement of the note stack towards the feed belt is discontinued.  To
prevent the removal of further notes after the lift motor has been
switched off, solenoid 9 is deactivated, with spacing lever 10
forcing the notes by spring 8 downward out of the operating range of
feed belt 2.

      If no note is removed from the stack after a particular "on
time", the lift movement is stopped and the entire stack is moved
downward by several millimeters away from the feed belt, followed by
a retry.

      In addition to sensor 7, other sensors are provided elsewhere.
These are used to determine the thickness of the notes, any skew, as
well as their width, spacing and number.  Notes are issued only if
the details thus established are correct and properly correlated.
Otherwise, the notes are retained in the machine and a new stack is
formed to be issued.

      Difficulties are encountered with thin notes which tend to
stick to each other rather strongly and therefore have to be moved
very slowly and cautiously towards the feed belt to prevent several
of them being removed at the same time.  The rate of removal of such
notes is about 2 to 4 per second at a tolerable error rate.

      Thick notes on other hand, which are readily detachable, are
relatively easy to remove from the stack.  A stack of such notes may
be advanced towards the feed belt in large steps and at high speeds.
The feed technology employed permits speeds of 20 to 30 notes per
second at a tolerable error rate.

      Currently, notes are rem...