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Self Selecting Search Method for Spell Correcting

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109585D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clark, DK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Current word processors provide a variety of methods to present misspelled words. These applications typically present a selection of candidates for the replacement of the misspelled word. Current art even allows the user to perform fuzzy word look-ups to present a possible replacement set for the misspelled word. For example, a user can specify "info*." Current applications will present the user with the known vocabulary of all words beginning with the letters i-n-f-o. Current applications also can automatically correct the misspelled word upon subsequent occurrences. However, the misspelled word must be misspelled exactly as first detected. Often a user misspells the same word differently, however the search patterns that a user creates to look up possible replacement words is typically the same.

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Self Selecting Search Method for Spell Correcting

       Current word processors provide a variety of methods to
present misspelled words.  These applications typically present a
selection of candidates for the replacement of the misspelled word.
Current art even allows the user to perform fuzzy word look-ups to
present a possible replacement set for the misspelled word. For
example, a user can specify "info*."  Current applications will
present the user with the known vocabulary of all words beginning
with the letters i-n-f-o.  Current applications also can
automatically correct the misspelled word upon subsequent
occurrences.  However, the misspelled word must be misspelled exactly
as first detected.  Often a user misspells the same word differently,
however the search patterns that a user creates to look up possible
replacement words is typically the same.  For example, if the word
information is misspelled differently more than once, the user may
use the search pattern (lookup pattern) of "i-n-f-o-*" twice.
Typically, the order of possible replacement values are the same for
identical search patterns, i.e., the replacement word is the same
selection value. Thus, the user must select the replacement value
again, though the user has used the same search pattern.  This forces
the user to make a selection, because although the word has been
previously detected as a misspelled word, the word spelling is
different from the first detection.  (The same word spelled wrong,
two different ways.)  This encumbers the user to make additional
selections.

      This...