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Hot Pressed Glass Ceramic on Aluminum Nitride Substrate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109597D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chance, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A process has been developed that can be used to manufacture ceramic packages comprised of both high thermal conductivity ceramics, such as aluminum nitride, and low resistivity metallurgies, such as copper. This technique is unique because high thermal conductivity ceramics typically require processing temperatures exceeding 1600~C, limiting the available metallurgies to high resistivity refractories, such as molybdenum and tungsten (*).

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Hot Pressed Glass Ceramic on Aluminum Nitride Substrate

       A process has been developed that can be used to
manufacture ceramic packages comprised of both high thermal
conductivity ceramics, such as aluminum nitride, and low resistivity
metallurgies, such as copper.  This technique is unique because high
thermal conductivity ceramics typically require processing
temperatures exceeding 1600~C, limiting the available metallurgies to
high resistivity refractories, such as molybdenum and tungsten (*).

      The module is comprised of two parts, a multilayer glass
ceramic/ copper structure (MLC), and an aluminum nitride substrate
base which may be pinned.  These are laminated together with pressure
to form a ceramic package.  A preferred embodiment preserves the low
dielectric constant of the glass ceramic matrix which permits
high-speed signal propagation.

      The manufacturing process consists of four steps: construction
of the green MLC layers, as done in typical MLC processing,
lamination of the green layers to an aluminum nitride substrate,
binder burn off to remove the organics, and firing of the structure
with pressure to obtain the sintered module.  Pins may then be
attached as required by brazing or mechanical pinning and soldering.

      Reference
(*)  J. Mroz and K. A. Blakely, Materials Engineering p. 21 (March
1992).