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Unifying Concept for Table Management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109608D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 152K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Maldonado, MF: AUTHOR

Abstract

The unifying concept described in this article treats three disparate classes as one class called tables. Using this concept eliminates coding similar functions for separate classes, provides simpler views for user interactions, and builds a more robust set of functions. The three disparate classes are validation lists, translation tables, and profiles.

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Unifying Concept for Table Management

       The unifying concept described in this article treats
three disparate classes as one class called tables.  Using this
concept eliminates coding similar functions for separate classes,
provides simpler views for user interactions, and builds a more
robust set of functions.  The three disparate classes are validation
lists, translation tables, and profiles.

      Validation lists or tables contain all the acceptable values
for a specific data field.  Its main purpose is the editing of data.
A validation check insures that a value for a data field is in the
validation list.  If the value is not in the list, then the check
fails.

      Translation tables are two columns of values used to substitute
one value for another value.  The procedure performed is a look-up on
the first column (from column) using a value needing translation.  If
the search value corresponds to a value in the first column, then the
procedure uses the corresponding value in the second column (to
column) of the same row.  When the search value does not correspond
to any value, the procedure uses a default value or returns an error.

      Profiles contain specific information, called attributes, about
entities, called objects.  Profiles exist for specific purposes.  As
an example, a registration profile may contain information about
users that access a computer system.  The profile has user ID, name,
location, department, access authorization, and remarks.

      By treating each class separately, the building of functions to
read, search, add, update, and delete are separate.  Additionally,
the end user sees these classes as three separate classes with its
own behavior.  Users deal with these classes in that way.  Finally,
there is no way of setting relationships between objects of the same
or different class.

      The central idea of this unifying concept is that each of the
three classes described before are instances of a table.  The term
table means an arrangement of rows and columns.  Each column
representing a specific attribute and each row representing a
specific instance of an object. Succinctly, it is the same as a table
in a relational system.

      The three class definitions are:
         * A validation list is the same as a one-column table.
         * A translation table is the same as a two-column table.

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 A profile is...