Browse Prior Art Database

Laminated Heat Sink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109627D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 104K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ellsworth, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a heat sink comprised of a multiplicity of plates having a pattern of through holes that, when laminated together, form a compact structure having many internal flow passages. Such a heat sink can be constructed by laminating specific types of plates in an appropriate sequence. For example, when the plates, 101 through 105, shown in Fig. 1, are laminated together in the sequence shown in Fig. 2, a heat sink 301 is formed with flow channels 302 as indicated in Fig. 3. Individual plates can be manufactured by stamping or photochemical machining to produce the through holes. The plates can be laminated together by E-beam welding, brazing, diffusion bonding, etc.

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Laminated Heat Sink

       Disclosed is a heat sink comprised of a multiplicity of
plates having a pattern of through holes that, when laminated
together, form a compact structure having many internal flow
passages.  Such a heat sink can be constructed by laminating specific
types of plates in an appropriate sequence.  For example, when the
plates, 101 through 105, shown in Fig. 1, are laminated together in
the sequence shown in Fig. 2, a heat sink 301 is formed with flow
channels 302 as indicated in Fig. 3.  Individual plates can be
manufactured by stamping or photochemical machining to produce the
through holes.  The plates can be laminated together by E-beam
welding, brazing, diffusion bonding, etc.

      Fig. 3 also illustrates the use of the heat sink in an
electronic cooling module.  An electronic chip 303 is mounted on
substrate 304.  The laminated heat sink 301 is in thermal contact
with the back side of the chip.  The heat sink sits in a hat
structure 305 having square holes so that a small gap exists between
the hat and the heat sink.  A dielectric fluid (e.g., fluorocarbon,
air, liquid nitrogen) will flow into a plenum 306 and then into the
square holes through a nozzle.  Since the gap between the hat and the
heat sink offers a large resistance to fluid flow, the fluid is
forced to flow through the heat sink, exiting at the bottom where it
can be carried out of the module.  Heat generated by the circuits in
the chip is conducted through the ch...