Browse Prior Art Database

Inter-cooperative Processing between Dissimilar File Control Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109663D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 4 page(s) / 151K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brien, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method for inter-cooperative processing between dissimilar file control systems is disclosed. The host application, using the control file for the personal workstation application, remaps the host files names and formats to the file names and formats expected by the application on the personal workstation before putting the files into "view" of the personal workstation.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 49% of the total text.

Inter-cooperative Processing between Dissimilar File Control Systems

       A method for inter-cooperative processing between
dissimilar file control systems is disclosed.  The host application,
using the control file for the personal workstation application,
remaps the host files names and formats to the file names and formats
expected by the application on the personal workstation before
putting the files into "view" of the personal workstation.

      The components of the "Virtual Make Utility" include:
1.  A Make file preprocessor is run to determine all of the "Host
File Control System" parts necessary to perform this Make.
2.  A server is contacted and the files necessary for the Make are
copied to the server's RAM drive or hard drive.
3.  The Make Utility is run against your Make file.
4.  Any output produced from the compile is copied back to the host
and the results are then stored into "Host File Control System."

      There are several macros defined to use with "Virtual Make
Utility."
o    The "Server Environment" macro selects the server machine type,
the operating system, and the "flavor" of the operating system.
o    The "Extension Overrides" macro maps a given "Host File Control
System" part type to a given personal computer (PC) extension; these
are global overrides of input files.
o    The "File Override" macro maps an "Host File Control System"
part to a PC filename.
o    The "Make" macro allows a different version of "Make" to be
specified.
o    The "Imbed" macro allows a file to be imbedded into the Make
file before the Make file is processed.
o    The "FileName" macro provides the passing of the host Make part
name to the Make file when sent to the server.

      The body of the Make file follows the Make Utility rules.

      Fig. 1 is an example of a Make file that was used on the
PC with Make Utility.  It shows that, in this case, the only line
that needed to be added was the Server Environment macro to instruct
"Virtual Make Utility" how to process the part.

      Fig. 2 is an example that includes an Extension Override macro.
In this example, the "HFCS_ZZZ" macro instructs "Virtual Make
Utility" to re-map all input files with an extension of ".ZZZ" to
"Host File Control System" part types of "ABCDE" before requesting
the file from "Host File Control System."  Therefore, the "BPROG
ABCDE" part is put in view of the compiler, as "BPROG.ZZZ."

      The PCPROC INFO part provides "Virtual Make Utility" with the
list of processes available on the servers for this product, the
outputs from each process that are to be returned to host, and how
they are to be mapped to "Host File Control System," if the output is
required or optional, and if the server should be locked during the
process.  It also groups the processes by flavor of the operating
system and by operating system.

      See Figs. 3 and 4 for the relationship of entries in the PCPROC
INFO part to lin...