Browse Prior Art Database

Guage Methodology for Event Completion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109667D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, G: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a service for which task management events can be monitored by an office system. This service would allow the user to designate which services and actions could access this mechanism. A gauge model can be utilized to solve this problem. A graphical gauge model can be presented to the user. This gauge model would display the magnitude at which events were completed for a specified period of time. The scale for the gauge would be modified dynamically as events were added by differing services. Thus, a task can have an associated scale marking on the gauge. Each grid marking on the gauge can represent an actual task. Completion of events would be designated by filling in the associated portion of the scale on the gauge. Fig. 1 illustrates a graphical model of the gauge as presented to the user.

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Guage Methodology for Event Completion

       This article describes a service for which task
management events can be monitored by an office system.  This service
would allow the user to designate which services and actions could
access this mechanism.  A gauge model can be utilized to solve this
problem.  A graphical gauge model can be presented to the user.  This
gauge model would display the magnitude at which events were
completed for a specified period of time.  The scale for the gauge
would be modified dynamically as events were added by differing
services.  Thus, a task can have an associated scale marking on the
gauge.  Each grid marking on the gauge can represent an actual task.
Completion of events would be designated by filling in the associated
portion of the scale on the gauge.  Fig. 1 illustrates a graphical
model of the gauge as presented to the user.

      Furthermore, the presentation of the gauge can be presented
within an iconic format as illustrated within Fig. 2 which shows a
task completion icon presented with other icons on a desktop.  This
icon can be enlarged to allow easier readability and allow individual
grid markings to be expanded.  The association of a scaler grid
marking to that of a task allows for the grid marking to be expanded
to reveal additional information about the particular task.

      This method differs from prior methods by providing an
automated process for task management.  The characteristics of task...