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Methodology for Graphical Containment for the Queuing of Actions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109670D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 136K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

With the advent of graphical desktop workstations, a need has arisen whereby a user can store a sequence of actions for future processing. Often, a user may have a series of point and select operations that they wish to perform. Often, the user may wish to know the consequences of a series of actions before they are performed. Currently, most desktop systems provide a mechanism for automating procedures (e.g., mouse recorder macros), but do not provide a mechanism for the desktop whereby the user can actually store actions. Some systems even allow the storing of data, such as documents and files, but do not provide a graphical interface that allows storing of data and the actions to be performed on the data.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 48% of the total text.

Methodology for Graphical Containment for the Queuing of Actions

       With the advent of graphical desktop workstations, a need
has arisen whereby a user can store a sequence of actions for future
processing.  Often, a user may have a series of point and select
operations that they wish to perform.  Often, the user may wish to
know the consequences of a series of actions before they are
performed.  Currently, most desktop systems provide a mechanism for
automating procedures (e.g., mouse recorder macros), but do not
provide a mechanism for the desktop whereby the user can actually
store actions.  Some systems even allow the storing of data, such as
documents and files, but do not provide a graphical interface that
allows storing of data and the actions to be performed on the data.

      This article describes a methodology whereby a graphical
desktop environment permits for the characteristics of icons to be
collected and processed according to the characteristics of other
icons.  This methodology provides for resolving contention of
resources for queued actions.

      A service can be developed which allows the user to create
models or "process paragons."  This provides for the creation of
passive queues.  These passive queues can consist of a pool of
tokens, where each token typically represents a distinct unit of data
(i.e., document, mail item, etc.).  The movement of objects to these
passive queues governs the number of tokens to be allocated, created,
deallocated or destroyed.  These objects can be graphically
represented within the domain of a passive queue.  Active queues or
check out counters are provided to allow for action-oriented objects
to be stored.

      These active queues provides an operation or series of
operations on a pool of tokens, namely, the passive queue.  An active
queue might be used to represent, for example, a printer, shredder or
both simultaneously.  Action-oriented objects that are contained
within an active queue can be assigned priorities, in terms of their
processing a particular token.  For example, an active queue or check
out counter, which contains a printer and shredder, may assign the
processing order of these objects, so that the printer performs the
action on a token(s) first and then the token(s) is passed to the
shredder function.  This check out counter would combine the
functions of print and delete into a single icon, namely, a check out
counter icon.  The passive queue maybe represented by a grocery cart
icon.  The active queue may be represented by a check out counter
icon.  The grocery cart icon permits the user to load up documents
and other objects into this cart for future processing.  This icon
can be opened on the user's request to view and examine items which
are loaded for processing.

      The capability of storing objects to be processed is of
relevance to graphical interfaces that allow multiple desktops.  This
technique would allow t...