Browse Prior Art Database

Environment Variable Descending Search Indicator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109689D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 114K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kardell, D: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a method for extending the environment-variable specifications to allow extended searching of subdirectories. It allows the user to specify special characters such as ' /s' to signal to the command processor and other programs that the subdirectory specified is to be searched along with all the subdirectories that exist below the initial search point.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Environment Variable Descending Search Indicator

       This article describes a method for extending the
environment-variable specifications to allow extended searching of
subdirectories.  It allows the user to specify special characters
such as ' /s' to signal to the command processor and other programs
that the subdirectory specified is to be searched along with all the
subdirectories that exist below the initial search point.

      Computer development platforms and business machines are
becoming increasingly complicated.  Large disk drives have become the
norm in most systems.  Therefore, the larger the drives, the more
computer users want to place on them.  Both DOS and OS/2* programs
use environment variables to locate files needed for correct
operation.  The setting of the environment variables can become a
very complicated and time-consuming task.  Most environment-variable
settings limit the total length allowed.  It has become increasingly
complicated to set up the environment variables to include every
directory on the hard disk that might need to be accessed.  There is
no way to tell the command processor or operating system to start a
search for a specified file in a root directory and have the system
search all subdirectories below the initial starting directory.

      Below are examples of how SET can be used to set the
environment variables in your OS/2 CONFIG.SYS file today.  Notice
that to specify the many subdirectories under C: OS2, the user must
specially specify all directories to be searched.
SET PATH=C: OS2;C: OS2 SYSTEM;C: OS2 INSTALL;C: OS2 TOOLS;C: UTILS;
SET DPATH=C: OS2;C: OS2 SYSTEM;C: OS2 INSTALL;C: UTILS;

      Below are examples of how SET could be used with the
implementation of this disclosure.  This would perform the same
objective.  All subdirectories under the C: OS2 directory would be
searched.  If subdirectories are dynamically added, the system would
ensure that they would be searched automatically.
SET PATH=C: OS2  /s;C: UTILS;
SET DPATH=C: OS2 /s;C: UTILS;

      Environment variables can define a relationship between
subdirectories and programs installed on a workstation.  Programs can
use the environment variables to locate files for correct program
operation.  For example, OS/2 uses the LIBPATH environment variable
to specify the search order for Dynamic Linked Libraries.  OS/2 uses
the PATH and HELP environment variables to find program files and
help files.  These environment variables are very crucial to the
operation of the software programs and the operating systems. ...