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Browse Prior Art Database

Wiring of Communication Switches with Optical Interconnect

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109696D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 111K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Engbersen, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Switches in communication controllers usually consist of two basic elements: the Switch Fabric Adapters (SFAs) and a Switch Fabric (SF). The general architecture is shown in Fig. 1a. Switches with a larger number of ports than the basic Switch Fabric Element (SFE) can be realized by either connecting multiple SFEs in parallel for a single stage or by cascading them for a multi-stage system. Fig. 1b shows two possibilities to connect four 2 x 2 SFE's as a 4 x 4 SF.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Wiring of Communication Switches with Optical Interconnect

       Switches in communication controllers usually consist of
two basic elements: the Switch Fabric Adapters (SFAs) and a Switch
Fabric (SF).  The general architecture is shown in Fig. 1a.  Switches
with a larger number of ports than the basic Switch Fabric Element
(SFE) can be realized by either connecting multiple SFEs in parallel
for a single stage or by cascading them for a multi-stage system.
Fig. 1b shows two possibilities to connect four 2 x 2 SFE's as a 4
x 4 SF.

      From an electrical and packaging point of view it is most
economical to directly connect SFAs to a SF.  In (*), a sophisticated
wiring and packaging methodology was presented which theoretically
allows to modularly extend switching systems while maintaining the
possibility of a direct SFA attachment.  However, for the multi-drop
nets in single-stage expansion there is no straightforward extension
to this approach.  These nets pose a difficult design challenge
since, beside restrictions on the total and the variation of lead
lengths, we also have to cope with fanout problems.

      In this context we propose to introduce a new building block
which can be universally used to interconnect multiple SFAs and SFEs
for single or multi-stage expanded networks of any size.  The main
function of this novel interface, shown in Fig. 2, is to provide an
optical signal breakout while maintaining the direct interconnect
possibility. ...