Browse Prior Art Database

Table Relocation Alternative for Restore

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109721D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bracht, CJ: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A method is described for restoring a database that contains spanned table objects to a machine that is not configured the same as the machine from which the database was backed up.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Table Relocation Alternative for Restore

       A method is described for restoring a database that
contains spanned table objects to a machine that is not configured
the same as the machine from which the database was backed up.

      Some descriptions of common restore problems follow.

      A user backs up a database which contains table objects that
have been spanned.  The objects' files are located on the C:, D:, and
E: drives.  At some point later in time, the user loses drive E:
(perhaps due to a head crash).  The user now needs to restore the
database from the backup media to the 2 existing drives: C: and D:.

      A user backs up a database which contains table objects that
have been spanned.  The objects' files are located on the C:, D:, and
E: drives.  The user wishes to restore the database to a different
machine that is configured with only a C: and D: drive.

      A user backs up a database that is 50 Meg in size and is
located on the C: drive.  The user attempts to restore the database
on a different machine which contains 2 drives, a C: and D:, each of
which is 40 Meg in size.  The user is unable to restore the database
because there is insufficient disk space on either drive.

      Where does the OS/2* Database Manager Restore Utility put the
table objects that were originally located on a drive that is now
non-existent?  How does a user restore a database that no longer fits
on the available drive?  One solution was to provide an interactive
Restore Utility that would prompt the user for the paths to store the
files.  However, from requirements gathering it was determined that
most users want a non-interactive Restore.

      The method described allows a user to alter the table object
location definitions before running the Restore Utility.

      The Database Manager stores the locations of all the table
objects in a file named SQL00001.ORF in the main database
subdirec...