Browse Prior Art Database

Notebook Control Cascading Tab Choices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109769D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Current art for graphical user interface (GUI) notebook controls associates each tab with only one possible user choice. Sometimes there are so many choices that it is not feasible to show all of them in one view to the user. For instance, Figure 1 shows a notebook control being used in an address book application. Sizing constraints on the tabs preclude the showing of all 26 alphabet letter tabs to the user at once, forcing the user to laboriously scroll the tab field to get to non-visible letters.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 75% of the total text.

Notebook Control Cascading Tab Choices

       Current art for graphical user interface (GUI) notebook
controls associates each tab with only one possible user choice.
Sometimes there are so many choices that it is not feasible to show
all of them in one view to the user.  For instance, Figure 1 shows a
notebook control being used in an address book application.  Sizing
constraints on the tabs preclude the showing of all 26 alphabet
letter tabs to the user at once, forcing the user to laboriously
scroll the tab field to get to non-visible letters.

      Current art in pop-up (contextual) menus on OS/2* 2.0 allow the
programmer to set up cascading menus which are optional for the user.
The menu choice has a name, and a boxed arrow at the far right (see
Figure 2).  This article describes a technique which extends the
construct described above for menus to notebook tabs.

      Figure 3 depicts how cascading tabs can be used to solve the
problem exemplified by the address book example of Figure 1.  Each
tab now has a multi-letter choice.  In addition, there is a boxed
arrow at the right of each tab.  If the user selects just the text,
then a default action would occur; for instance, clicking on the
'U-W' text might cause the client area to show the beginning of the
'U' entries.  If, however, the user clicks on the arrow, a cascade
menu would pop-up with a separate line for each of the letters in the
range.  The user would then be able to navigate directly...