Browse Prior Art Database

Calling Card Interface for Visual Telephony

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109773D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 127K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aldred, BK: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described is a user interface for a Visual Communication Workstation (VCW) which introduces an electronic equivalent to the conventional paper printed calling or business card.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Calling Card Interface for Visual Telephony

       Described is a user interface for a Visual Communication
Workstation (VCW) which introduces an electronic equivalent to the
conventional paper printed calling or business card.

      The integration of visual communications and multi-media into
the Personal Computer (PC) make it possible to conduct business
without travelling in order to hold a meeting or make a personal
call.  Such visual communication workstations must be easy to use for
business persons who are not computer-literate.  It is desirable to
make the workstation user interface as a natural extension to current
ways of working which this disclosure enhances by emulation of the
calling card.

      Hardware and software which will convert a standard PC into a
tool for voice and data communications is attractive to many video
users.  Such a system offers advantages: reductions in cost and in
time spent travelling to meetings.  The Business or Calling Card is
indispensable for the conduct of business serving many purposes such
as showing a company's name and logo, a person's title, all relevant
information about that person and allows their standing in an
organization to be assessed.

      Upon installation of the Visual Communication software and
hardware in a Personal Computer, the user is asked to define his
Electronic Calling Card (ECC) which will subsequently be used for all
visual communications to other similar workstations.  To the user,
the ECC will appear as a image-containing text, image and graphics,
but to the VCW software it will appear either as the image or as a
number of machine readable fields which normally occur on standard
business cards:
      Person's name;  Company (name and logo);  Title, e.g., Senior
Vice President;  Addresses (work and home);  Phone number(s); Fax
number(s);  E-mail number(s), and so on.

      Note that the Phone, Fax and E-mail numbers may become one and
the same if the visual communication workstation is capable of
handling all types of communication traffic.  An ECC could be
generated automatically for a user from a skeleton which contains
common company information, such as logo, address, etc.  (This is how
the standard IBM business card with the company logo would be
generated.)  However, the opportunity exists for creative design of
calling cards such that complex graphics, text fonts, images, action
video sequences and even musical 'signature tunes' could be used for
a highly personalized multi-media calling card.  Note that, even
though the ECC contains many fields which are held in coded form
(e.g., ASCII text) such that they can be read and used by the
workstation software, the user will see a complete image of the card
in a form as intended by the designer of the card.  This is how the
card will always be made visible to the user.

      Once installed in the workstation, the ECC is used whenever
possible.  Calling Cards are onl...