Browse Prior Art Database

Entry Information Buffer for OS/2 Office Address Book

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109791D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boeving, RD: AUTHOR

Abstract

This invention describes a method by which an OS/2* Office user can store up to 64K bytes of information in a buffer that is associated with an OS/2 Office address book entry.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Entry Information Buffer for OS/2 Office Address Book

       This invention describes a method by which an OS/2*
Office user can store up to 64K bytes of information in a buffer that
is associated with an OS/2 Office address book entry.

      In OS/2 Office, directories appear as icons on the Office
window.  Each directory contains two address books; one called
PUBLIC, which the OS/2 Office administrator maintains, and the other
called PERSONAL, which is an OS/2 Office user's private address book.

      Address books contain groups of information called address book
entries.  Address book entries contain a variety of information, such
as an individual's name, telephone number, address, etc.  The type
and amount of information that an address book entry holds is
dependent upon its directory.  When the OS/2 Office administrator
creates a directory, he/she also creates a template for address book
entries of that directory.  Thus, within a directory, all address
book entries share the same information template whether they reside
in the PUBLIC or PERSONAL address book.

      A user can open an address book entry by double clicking on the
icon for that entry, or by selecting the icon and using the File/Open
pull-down.  When an address book entry is opened, an "Entry" dialog
is displayed.  The information for that address book entry is
displayed in the fields on the dialog.

      Within OS/2 Office Address Book, the amount of information that
can be contained in an address book entry is very limited.  This
invention describes a new buffer, in which, OS/2 Office users can
store information about an Address Book entry.  This buffer will be
called the Entry Information Buffer (EIB).  Every OS/2 Office user
will have his/her own private EIB for each address book entry.

      A new button on the Entry dialog box will invoke the EIB.  When
this button is pushed, the directory code will query the directory
database to retrieve the EIB for the address book entry.  An OS/2
Office Writing Pad session will then appear with the EIB in it.  The
user can then update the information.  When the user saves the file,
the new EIB will be sent back to the directory database to be stored.

      The EIBs will be stored in the Office database in a new table.
The table will have four fields for each EIB.  They are as follows:
OWNER    ...