Browse Prior Art Database

Auto Latch Delatching Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109804D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 4 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Shigaki, H: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a self-delatching (or disengaging) mechanism, which a lever or handle does not need to be operated by hand when the latch is released. This mechanism enables the disengagement of the latch by natural movement.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 91% of the total text.

Auto Latch Delatching Mechanism

       Disclosed is a self-delatching (or disengaging)
mechanism, which a lever or handle does not need to be operated by
hand when the latch is released.  This mechanism enables the
disengagement of the latch by natural movement.

      Usually, a latch needs to be moved or pinched when it is
released as shown in Fig. 1.  This means that it is difficult for a
person who is unfamiliar with this kind of mechanism or who does not
know where the latch is to disengage the latch at the
product-operating position, without moving or turning the product
upside down.

      In Fig. 2, this mechanism was originally designed in order that
the EMI gasket should be contacted perfectly with mating metal sheets
for one-box personal systems.

      The use of only two thumbscrews for EMI contact between the
gaskets and the sheet metal was found not to be sufficient and
improvement was required.

      In Fig. 3, assuming that the latch spring force is "A" and the
gasket reaction force is "B", if A>B, then the EMI gasket and sheet
metal contact each other and the EMI shield is functionally
satisfied.

      Fig. 4 shows the detailed mechanism.
1.   The latch is engaged with mating sheet metal when the logic is
installed.
2.   The latch is on hold.
3.   By adding a force stronger than A, the latch is disengaged
because the top of the latch is pushed at the X point and bends
downwards. Refer to Fig. 5.
4.   When the latch bend...