Browse Prior Art Database

Transfer Inhibit Corona for Electrophotographic Fanfold Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109883D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 3 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mabrouk, SA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows a typical electrophotographic fanfold printer. The printing process starts with a clean photoconductor 10, usually in the form of a drum or belt. Charge corona 1 charges the photoconductor to a predetermined voltage level with polarity that depends on the electrical characteristics of the photoconductor. The incoming data to be printed is then fed to the electrical drive of printhead 2, which will discharge the photoconductor accordingly and leave on the photoconductor a latent electrostatic image that represents the incoming data. The latent image will then be developed to a visible image by development station 3 by depositing toner in areas representing the incoming data.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Transfer Inhibit Corona for Electrophotographic Fanfold Printers

       Fig. 1 shows a typical electrophotographic fanfold
printer.  The printing process starts with a clean photoconductor 10,
usually in the form of a drum or belt.  Charge corona 1 charges the
photoconductor to a predetermined voltage level with polarity that
depends on the electrical characteristics of the photoconductor.  The
incoming data to be printed is then fed to the electrical drive of
printhead 2, which will discharge the photoconductor accordingly and
leave on the photoconductor a latent electrostatic image that
represents the incoming data.  The latent image will then be
developed to a visible image by development station 3 by depositing
toner in areas representing the incoming data.  In most cases, a
pre-transfer exposure lamp 4 discharges the electrostatic latent
image to make it easier for the toner to transfer to the paper.  At
transfer station 5, paper line 12 is brought into intimate contact
with the photoconductor and the transfer corona deposits a charge on
the paper of opposite polarity to the toner.  Residual toner left on
the photoconductor will then be removed from the photoconductor by
cleaning station 6 for the photoconductor to start another printing
cycle.

      Occasionally, an error occurs while imaging or developing a
panel, resulting in a defective panel which should not be transferred
to the paper.  However, since the transfer station of
electrophotographic printers does not have a small footprint and the
paperline usually maintains a wide contact area (typically, 12 to 25
mm), the paperline cannot be lifted at the boundary between a good
printed panel and a defective printed panel on the photoconductor
without trans...