Browse Prior Art Database

Method to Hide Normal OS/2 User Interface for a Controlled Platform

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109904D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miller, MM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of hiding the normal user interface to OS/2* facilities in a dedicated OS/2 system. This method applies to OS/2 1.3 based systems where the purpose is to provide a set of applications for a user and prevent the system from being altered while it is operating.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method to Hide Normal OS/2 User Interface for a Controlled Platform

       Disclosed is a method of hiding the normal user interface
to OS/2* facilities in a dedicated OS/2 system.  This method applies
to OS/2 1.3 based systems where the purpose is to provide a set of
applications for a user and prevent the system from being altered
while it is operating.

      To prevent an end user in altering a dedicated OS/2 system, it
is necessary to hide the OS/2 facilities that allow the user to
change, add or remove applications.

      To accomplish this, only a set of predefined applications are
allowed to start.  The Desktop and Group windows are hidden from the
user.  An application selection program called the Task Driver is the
only application a user interacts to run other applications.  Task
Driver is started whenever the OS/2 system is initiated (described
below) and contains a selection list from which a user can start the
predefined applications.  Task Driver is disabled from "closing" or
terminating, using PM control to "grey out" the "close" pulldown
choice under the system menu bar.  Thus Task Driver is the only
interface for user to manage applications on this platform.  The
normal way to add, remove or change applications from a Group window
or Command window is not accessible to the user.

      OS/2 is initially set up to start only the Desktop window and
not any Program Group.  The Desktop window is re-sized to its
minimum, but not iconized, and moved to the lower corner of the
screen.  A developer then uses the "Save" pulldown choice from the
Desktop window to save this state in the OS2.INI file.  Subsequently,
whenever the system is rebooted, only a small corner of the Desktop
window can be seen (until it is removed by the Icon Hide program,
described below).

      The PROTSHELL statement in the CONFIG.SYS file is altered to
point to a program, called Starter, that starts the other programs,
rather than pointing to the OS/2 command processor CMD.EXE.  A
STARTUP.CMD file in the root directory of the "C" drive must be
present to cause the kernel to initiate this program.  Therefore,
whenever this system is rebooted, the...