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Method for Generating Customized Scheduling Engines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000109977D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 7 page(s) / 251K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hirose, S: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for enabling end users to customize scheduling engines, which solve job-shop scheduling problems, by themselves. Since the operations for customization are only selecting items on the screen with a mouse, this method does not require any programming skills. Another strong point of this method is that efficient use of system resources is achieved, because the resultant scheduling engine module does not contain any superfluous parts.

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Method for Generating Customized Scheduling Engines

       Disclosed is a method for enabling end users to customize
scheduling engines, which solve job-shop scheduling problems, by
themselves.  Since the operations for customization are only
selecting items on the screen with a mouse, this method does not
require any programming skills.  Another strong point of this method
is that efficient use of system resources is achieved, because the
resultant scheduling engine module does not contain any superfluous
parts.

      Basically, customizing a scheduling engine is to exchange
"parts", which are attached to "sockets" of the scheduling engine
kernel, according to functional requirements of each scheduling
application (Fig. 1).  Sometimes an application needs more than one
scheduling engine with different functions.  In such a case, a
special socket of the kernel is equipped with a "parts exchanger" and
parts are exchanged dynamically by the parts exchanger (Fig. 2).
When activation of another scheduling engine is required, the parts
exchanger is notified of the identifier of the new scheduling engine,
and then the parts exchanger installs an appropiate part in each
socket of the kernel.  This makes it possible for scheduling engines
in a module to share a single copy of the kernel.

      The kernel provides general functions that are common to all
scheduling engines.  It is independent of application-specific
requirements.  On the other hand, a parts exchanger must know how to
configure each scheduling engine in a module.  Therefore, in this
method, a parts exchanger is generated for each application.
"Customization" in this method means to generate a parts exchanger
that is specific to the target application, and then to link the
kernel, the parts exchanger, and required parts into a single module.

      Usually, functions of a scheduling engine are characterized by
the parts which are attached to the kernel.  However, this method
does not restrict the way of changing behavior of a scheduling engine
to exchange of parts; this method can be applied to the case where a
scheduling engine kernel has operation modes to change its behavior.

      Fig. 3 shows the system architecture of this method.

      "Dialogue panel display" presents a list of alternatives and
receives the user's selection.  It also displays auxiliary
information and push buttons for special operations as required.

      "Parts information storage" contains the information on
available parts (developed beforehand).  Since each part is made to
operate on a specific socket, parts are grouped by socket.  That is,
the information consists of the descriptions of sockets, each of
which is a tuple of:
         - internal name of a socket,
         - text data that explains what kind of scheduling eng...