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Method for Producing Homogeneous Thin Films for the Fabrication of High-Tc Superconductors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110019D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clark, GJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for homogenizing a multilayer thin film to produce a composition desired for the fabrication of high-Tc superconductors without the need for a prolonged high-temperature anneal.

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Method for Producing Homogeneous Thin Films for the Fabrication of High-Tc Superconductors

       Disclosed is a process for homogenizing a multilayer thin
film to produce a composition desired for the fabrication of high-Tc
superconductors without the  need for a prolonged high-temperature
anneal.

      High-Tc superconducting materials typically have a complex
chemical composition, consisting of several elements.  A thin film of
the required composition can be deposited as a sequence of individual
layers whose average composition is the desired one.  This method is
often more convenient than depositing several elements
simultaneously.  The multilayer structure is rendered homogeneous in
its average composition by using ion beam mixing, which causes
athermal atom transport (1) over distances of several tens of
nanometers, depending on the ion dose.  Therefore, a multilayer film
can be made more uniform in composition without the need to use an
elevated temperature to promote interdiffusion (2).

      A subsequent anneal at modest temperature is used to
crystallize the bombarded film, and to introduce oxygen, as needed.
Many systems are made amorphous by ion bombardment, and when annealed
form metastable phases which cannot be formed, or are unstable, in
prolonged anneals at the higher temperatures necessary to homogenize
films by thermal means alone.  New phases, which may have desirable
properties, can be formed in this way.

      References
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