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Rectangular Object Manipulator using a Combination Menu

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110028D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kitamura, K: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for manipulating rectangular objects by using a combination menu.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

Rectangular Object Manipulator using a Combination Menu

       Disclosed is a method for manipulating rectangular
objects by using a combination menu.

      In a graphical user interface, rectangular objects, such as
graphics primitives and selection windows, are fundamental and
frequently used.  They are usually manipulated in two steps: the
first is to select the edges of a rectangular object, and the second
is to move them horizontally or vertically for zooming,
transposition, and so on.  In the first step, it is necessary to
select one of the 15 combinations that include between one and four
of the edges (ABCD): A, B, C, D, AB, BC, CD, DA, AC, BD, ABC,
BCD, CDA, DAB, and ABCD.  For ease-of-use in the user interface, a
single operation would be preferable, since the number of operations
is directly related to the ease-of-use.  However, this is not
possible in existing methods.

      The disclosed method focuses on supporting a single operation
and provides a menu for selecting one of these 15 combinations by a
single operation, as shown in Fig. 1.  The relations between the menu
items and the selected combinations are shown in Fig. 2.  The menu
consists of 17 areas, including two redundant areas (AC, BD) for
symmetry in the shape of the menu.  So that the menu will be easy to
remember, all the areas that include X (=A, B, C, or D) are
connected, except the two areas AC and BD.  For example, if X=A, then
the areas AC, A, AB, DAB, DA, ABC, ABCD, and...