Browse Prior Art Database

CICS Resource Ownership and Transfer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110094D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Andrews, K: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article concerns the ownership and transfer of resources in a transaction-processing system such as CICS*. The essential requirements for such resources are that: * they have known ownership, * ownership can be passed to another owner, * they can be recovered if the owner fails.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

CICS Resource Ownership and Transfer

       This article concerns the ownership and transfer of
resources in a transaction-processing system such as CICS*. The
essential requirements for such resources are that:
      *    they have known ownership,
      *    ownership can be passed to another owner,
      *    they can be recovered if the owner fails.

      A language is proposed whereby the freeing of resources by one
task to be taken up by another task without flow of control is made
possible.  Programs can be written that access other programs or
simulate a terminal.

      In the IBM Customer Information Control System (CICS), a task
owns resources;  a resource is owned by one and only one task.
Resources can be passed on to another task, but only implicitly as
part of transferring flow of control.  This is done with CICS verbs
such as LINK, XCTL and RETURN TRANSID().

      Enhancements for the CICS Enterprise System Architecture
(CICS/ESA*) Front End Programming Interface required a new type of
resource which could possibly be owned and used by many tasks in
succession but which did not transfer flow of control to each other.
To do so it was necessary to overcome the following problems:
      *    to ensure use by only one task at a time,
      *    to be able to pass ownership without flow of control,
      *    to recover from ill-behaved or cancelled tasks not freeing
a resource.

      Rather than imbedding a special case in CICS, a solution of
general applicability was sought as follows.  In both lists, the
final item (marked (*)) is a new idea.
*    A resource is owned by the task which creates it until:
      -    The task...