Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Focal Point Function for Client Server Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110097D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 145K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bell, LK: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a method for allowing Server and/or Client Applications in OS/2* to behave in a focal-point manner (using a focal point "Mini-broadcast" function) and specify and maintain focal-point message information for use by the focal-point "Mini-broadcast" function.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 44% of the total text.

Focal Point Function for Client Server Applications

       This article describes a method for allowing Server
and/or Client Applications in OS/2* to behave in a focal-point manner
(using a focal point "Mini-broadcast" function) and specify and
maintain focal-point message information for use by the focal-point
"Mini-broadcast" function.

      A Client (or Requester) Application makes requests for
information and services (actions) from another application.  A
Server Application supplies information and performs services or
actions at the request of another application (Client/Requester).
User Exits allow a single Client Application to be notified by the
Server Application by allowing the Client Application to replace or
overlay a Server function/action with one that the Client Application
specifies.

      In a non-focal-point approach, a Server Application must make
more than one message notification (for example: when posting or
sending a message) when multiple Client Applications need the same
message notification(s).  The Server Application must also specify
exactly which Client Application(s) should be notified.  In a focal
point approach, a Server Application makes ONLY one message
notification even if more than one Client Application needs that
notification.  Some Server Applications currently allow Client
Applications to request notification of a limited number of messages,
but those Client Applications must code specifically to that
particular Server Application's API.  This limits the Client
application's interactions to a specific Server application and does
not allow the Client application any flexibility to interact with
other (similar) Server applications without major code revisions.
Hard coding non-focal-point message notifications in Server
applications limits the usefulness of the Server application by tying
it to a limited number of Client applications.  In addition, it
increases application complexity, development time and maintenance
costs for both Client and Server applications.  Although Presentation
Manager* (PM) DOES allow an application to broadcast a message to all
PM frame windows on the desktop, this method of notification is slow,
inefficient and indiscriminate.  EVERY frame window receives EVERY PM
broadcast message, whether it is interested in it or not.

      In a focal-point approach, the only messages a Client
application receives from a Server application are messages the
Client has expressed an interest in receiving.  Use of a focal point
approach allows one or more Client applications to receive a specific
Server application's messages without having to write to the Server
application's API, replace User Exits or catch globally broadcast
messages.

      A focal point "Mini-broadcast" function (or application) will
allow Client and Server applications to behave in a focal-point
manner.  A Mini-Broadcast Registration Application will allow Client
and Server applications t...