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Browse Prior Art Database

Computerizing Video Surveillance Techniques

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110105D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mitchell, D: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes how existing conventional security arrangements of manual video camera surveillance can be replaced by a computer system to provide more flexibility, enhanced facilities, integration with other applications and potential savings. Numerous permutations of security functions become programmable without electromechanical devices.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Computerizing Video Surveillance Techniques

       This article describes how existing conventional security
arrangements of manual video camera surveillance can be replaced by a
computer system to provide more flexibility, enhanced facilities,
integration with other applications and potential savings.  Numerous
permutations of security functions become programmable without
electromechanical devices.

      An installation would comprise one or more stations, each
consisting of a computer attached to one or more TV cameras.  Cameras
connected to the computer allow the following options.  Video input
from a camera is displayed in a window on the computer display via a
special adapter, such as the IBM ActionMedia II or M-Motion adapters.
Cameras can be selected and adjusted to pan, tilt, zoom, focus and so
on, under software control employing a control unit attached to a
serial or parallel port.  Refer to description of Camera Controller
in the last paragraph of this article.

      The computer would be running a surveillance application within
a Graphical User Interface (GUI) environment, such as OS/2* or
Windows.  This allows the operator to control the cameras in a
simple, natural way, by moving sliders and pressing buttons,
preferably using a touch screen.  Displayed will be digitized maps
showing camera locations and fields of view with buttons on the map
as an easy way to select given cameras.  Also simultaneous access to
other security applications, such as the control of lighting levels
and badge-locked door control.  Finally data like directories of
employee car registration numbers now becomes available.

      Other features that the surveillance application could offer
include: the ability to pre-program camera movements; switching from
one camera to another, selection of a given view or scanning through
a given angle either at given times or periodically.  Assuming a
simple macro language to control the cameras, and the ability to
assign specific macros to particular buttons, it is possible to make
radical changes to the behavior and properties of the system entirely
through software.  Frame capture is possible either periodically or
on demand, with the ability to save images to a hard disk for later
examination.  Motion detection can be done by comparing succes...