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Mapping Calendar Events to Multimedia Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110179D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 4 page(s) / 409K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baber, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is possible to graph calendar events by representing each event as a series of graphic rectangles of the same color, each rectangle corresponding to a constant time increment, typically fifteen minutes. Then the rectangles are displayed on a time line. If two events occur at the same time, they are stacked, creating a column. There are no blank spaces in any column that has a rectangle. This type of graph (Fig. 1) shows at a glance what times during a day are most busy. A rule of this type of display is that no "white area" may be left in a stack of blocks. In order to map these calendar events to the display, events must be broken into uniform time blocks. The problem is how to do this efficiently.

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Mapping Calendar Events to Multimedia Display

       It is possible to graph calendar events by representing
each event as a series of graphic rectangles of the same color, each
rectangle corresponding to a constant time increment, typically
fifteen minutes.  Then the rectangles are displayed on a time line.
If two events occur at the same time, they are stacked, creating a
column.  There are no blank spaces in any column that has a
rectangle.  This type of graph (Fig. 1) shows at a glance what times
during a day are most busy.  A rule of this type of display is that
no "white area" may be left in a stack of blocks.  In order to map
these calendar events to the display, events must be broken into
uniform time blocks.  The problem is how to do this efficiently.

      Define a two-dimensional data structure to correspond to the
x-y bar graph used in the multimedia display.  In Smalltalk*, this is
an Indexed Collection of Associations.  Each association consists of
a key and a value.  The keys are Time objects at intervals of
fifteen- minutes, and the values are Ordered Collections of events
which occur beginning at that time.  The overall time span of these
keys is input by the user and stored in an object called a
"searchRequest".  The problem becomes how to chop the events returned
by the Calendar queries into fifteen-minute "chunks" and position
these in the proper Ordered Collection (Fig. 2).

      Each Time key may be pictured as a tic on the x coordinate of
the graph.  What we want to do is to use these tics to chop up
events that span the tic mark, much...