Browse Prior Art Database

Reverse Path Accumulation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110188D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cidon, I: AUTHOR [+8]

Abstract

This article presents a technique that allows a packet, as it flows across a network, to accumulate the path back to the source. The packet may be routed across the network using any convenient routing mechanism. This technique allows the receiver of the packet to send a response to the source over the same path as the original packet using the Automatic Network Routing (ANR) routing mechanism.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Reverse Path Accumulation

       This article presents a technique that allows a packet,
as it flows across a network, to accumulate the path back to the
source.  The packet may be routed across the network using any
convenient routing mechanism.  This technique allows the receiver of
the packet to send a response to the source over the same path as the
original packet using the Automatic Network Routing (ANR) routing
mechanism.

      The ANR routing mechanism utilizes an ANR routing field, which
contains all the information necessary for the routing of the packet
both between the nodes along the path and to the destination in the
final node.  The ANR routing field is composed of one or more ANR
labels.  Each ANR label is used by a node which switches the packet
according to the ANR label information.  As the packet progresses
through the network, the "used" routing labels are stripped off, so
that the first label in the ANR routing field always contains the
next routing information to be used.

      ANR labels represent either the transmission links between
different nodes or the destination of the packet within the last node
of the path.  Each link is assigned two ANR labels (one by the node
at each end), and each of these labels is unique only in the node
where it was assigned.  Thus, the labels at each end of the link are
unrelated and will typically be different.  For additional
information on ANR routing, see "An Approach to Integrated High-Speed
Private Networks" by Israel Cidon and Inder S. Gopal, International
Journal of Digital and Analog Cabled Systems, April-June 1988, pp
77-85.

      In this article, the source includes a reverse ANR field in the
original packet and preloads this field with a label identifying
itself.  Then, as the packet passes through the network, the reverse
ANR lab...