Browse Prior Art Database

Bearing for Reciprocating Cam Follower Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110214D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kriehn, BJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a Reciprocating Cam Follower, an improved bearing design for bearing-rail actuator systems which offers better positioning capabilities and stability than the prior art.

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Bearing for Reciprocating Cam Follower Applications

      Disclosed is a Reciprocating Cam Follower, an improved bearing
design for bearing-rail actuator systems which offers better
positioning capabilities and stability than the prior art.

      In a bearing rail system, a misalignment of the bearing and
rail travel directions will result in an outer race translation.
With deep groove ball bearings, this motion causes a change in the
distance from the bearings centerline to its contact location on the
rail.

      The deep groove ball bearings internal geometry causes the
radial change to increase exponentially with increasing misalignment.
In addition to growth, this phenomenon can increase the force at the
rail, thus leading to increased rail wear.

      Varying growth at the bearings during random actuator seeking
can cause movements of the carriage centerline, also known as
actuator "TILT".

      The improved bearing design eliminates bearing radial growth
under the conditions described above.  The design comprises a flat
outer race track parallel to the rail to prevent growth during outer
race side to side movements.  A "gothic arch" inner race provides
two-point contact to the bearing ball, giving stability while keeping
the ball in line with the inner race.

      The bearing has been dubbed a Reciprocating Cam Follower (RCF)
and has shown a marked improvement in positioning, as well as
resiliency to misalignment-induced tilt during benc...