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Low Inertia Rotary Actuator Arm Comb

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110220D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Watrous, RB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows a low inertia, rotary actuator, arm comb for use in a data storage file. The arm's metal tubes, preferably non-magnetic stainless steel, have been bent into a V shape. A hole has been punched through the OD tube wall at the apex of the V. The ends of the two legs of the V ore fastened into slots in a compact, low inertia hub, typically made of magnesium or aluminum. The fastening can be done by crimping, swaging, or epoxy bonding the tubes into the slots. Head/suspension assemblies are fastened, preferably welded, to the upper and lower surfaces of the formed tube at the apex of the V. In addition to forming a rigid lightweight arm, the tube is used as a conduit for the electrical wires running from the R/W heads back to the hub.

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Low Inertia Rotary Actuator Arm Comb

      Fig. 1 shows a low inertia, rotary actuator, arm comb for use
in a data storage file.  The arm's metal tubes, preferably
non-magnetic stainless steel, have been bent into a V shape.  A hole
has been punched through the OD tube wall at the apex of the V.  The
ends of the two legs of the V ore fastened into slots in a compact,
low inertia hub, typically made of magnesium or aluminum.  The
fastening can be done by crimping, swaging, or epoxy bonding the
tubes into the slots.  Head/suspension assemblies are fastened,
preferably welded, to the upper and lower surfaces of the formed tube
at the apex of the V.  In addition to forming a rigid lightweight
arm, the tube is used as a conduit for the electrical wires running
from the R/W heads back to the hub.  Thus, the wires in the tube
cannot go astray and rub against the closely spaced spinning disks
and they are also provided with a good electrical shield.  The wires
running from the arm apex out to the R/W heads are on the back side
(i.e., side away from the disks) of the suspensions and so are also
constrained from contacting the disks.

      Disclosed anonymously.