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Intelligent Computer Keyboard for Entering Texts of Sinhalese and Other Similar Languages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110243D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 4 page(s) / 132K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bandara, U: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is a method which allows entering a native language text in Latin characters using a standard keyboard and pronouncing the words in a manner similar to the English language.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Intelligent Computer Keyboard for Entering Texts of Sinhalese and Other Similar Languages

       Described is a method which allows entering a native
language text in Latin characters using a standard keyboard and
pronouncing the words in a manner similar to the English language.

      The task of entering South Asian language texts in, say,
Burmese, Sinhalese, Tamil, Thai, and other languages native to the
Indian peninsula with the aid of a standard international keyboard is
difficult for two reasons.  The size of the alphabet exceeds the
number of keys on the keyboard and several basic characters are
placed in the same character field to form a composite character
known as literal, where the character field is defined by the cursor
position of a standard display and a keyboard.

      A literal frequently represents a consonant plus vowel sound in
the middle of a word.  Fig. 1 shows the literal associated with the
consonant p and the vowel i and that combined with the fricative r,
i.e., pi and pri.  As shown in this figure, the composite literals pi
and pri take the place of a single character field in the sense of
the Latin character system.  The character position is divided into
three layers: head, trunk and foot.  The basic characters coming into
the head and/or foot represent the vowel, while the middle part is
filled with the consonant itself.

      Editing texts with such literals is a formidable task, because
the standard cursor has to be divided into three parts: upper, middle
and lower part, as described above.  During editing, it must be
possible to replace or delete the contents of one part independently
of the other two parts.  Having typed the consonant in the middle
part, the backspace key may be used to go back and fill the upper or
the lower parts of this position, etc.

      Fig. 2 shows a sample text in which Latin characters are
entered using a standard text editor and the resulting native text is
issued by a standard matrix printer.

      A word of this sample text, which is defined as a string of
Latin characters between two blanks, is sequentially processed in the
following passes.
      Pass 1

      All synonymous characters are converted into a predefined
unique character, so that, for example,
      v w...