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Rolling Safety Stand for Desktop Displays

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110272D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Leise, LE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Even though display sizes are shrinking, many desktop displays take up a considerable amount of space, and are heavy and difficult to move. Attempts to put them on rollers have not been successful because the display would roll off the desk if the top were slanted or simply not level. Also, the display might roll off if it were near the edge of a level desk and got bumped.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Rolling Safety Stand for Desktop Displays

       Even though display sizes are shrinking, many desktop
displays take up a considerable amount of space, and are heavy and
difficult to move.  Attempts to put them on rollers have not been
successful because the display would roll off the desk if the top
were slanted or simply not level.  Also, the display might roll off
if it were near the edge of a level desk and got bumped.

      This article describes a rolling display stand that will not
roll without some upward pressure.  This stand can be incorporated
into larger CAD/CAM displays, such as the IBM 5080, that are
difficult for one person to position on a desk or table surface.  It
can also be used on PS/2* monitors, so that they can be positioned
for optimum viewing when in use, and then moved out of the way when
not in use.  This feature is in addition to the normal tilt/swivel
mechanism presently used on many monitors.

      The principle is similar to that of a rolling safety ladder or
stool.  The safety ladder or stool is free to roll about until the
weight of a person is added.  When this weight is added, a spring is
compressed and the rubber feet then rest on the floor, no longer
permitting it to roll about.

      The display stand has 4 or 5 balls (depending on the amount of
support required) attached to springs.  The springs are selected
according to the weight of the display.  Under a load of 80 percent
of the weight of the display, th...