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Detection and Isolation of Duplicate Unique Addresses

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110274D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 4 page(s) / 152K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Calia, D: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Many network architectures use unique addresses to identify entities or resources in the network. Examples of such networks are APPN (1), IP (2) and Frame Relay officer SVC (Switched Virtual Circuits) (3). When using a unique addressing space in a network, it is always possible to mistakenly assign the same address twice. This can result in data being routed to the correct address but the wrong node. Clearly, without the detection of this problem and the isolation of the offending resources, the integrity of the network is at risk. This article discloses a method for dynamically detecting and isolating duplicate unique addresses in a network.

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Detection and Isolation of Duplicate Unique Addresses

       Many network architectures use unique addresses to
identify entities or resources in the network.  Examples of such
networks are APPN (1), IP (2) and Frame Relay officer SVC (Switched
Virtual Circuits) (3).  When using a unique addressing space in a
network, it is always possible to mistakenly assign the same address
twice.  This can result in data being routed to the correct address
but the wrong node.  Clearly, without the detection of this problem
and the isolation of the offending resources, the integrity of the
network is at risk.  This article discloses a method for dynamically
detecting and isolating duplicate unique addresses in a network.

      For the purposes of this article, it is assumed that an address
resolution protocol which issues network searches exists.  Examples
of such network searches are the SNA APPN LOCATE (1) and the IP ARP
(2).  In this article, the address resolution protocol's network
search is generically referred to as the QUERY.  The QUERY is sent to
other nodes in the network and contains the unique address of the
target resource, as well as the unique address of the source
resource.  The node sending the QUERY is referred to as the origin
node .  The query may be sent point to point, directly to one other
node, or it may be broadcast to a group of nodes in its network.

      If a node contains the target resource, it will respond to the
origin node with a QUERY REPLY.  The QUERY REPLY contains the address
of the target resource and information necessary to reach the target
in the network, e.g., the node where a resource is located.  The node
sending the QUERY REPLY is called the destination node.  In addition,
as part of the address resolution protocol there is another message
called the QUERY NOTIFY.  A node sends this mess...