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Methodology for Object Close utilizing a Point and Shoot Cursor Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110309D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 4 page(s) / 187K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A methodology is described which allows a user to set the mouse cursor in one place and aim it at an object in order to close it from the desktop in a fast and convenient manner. The object must be visible, but does not have to be accessible in the foreground. Furthermore, the previously disclosed methodology for test probes is used for determining objects being pointed at.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 41% of the total text.

Methodology for Object Close utilizing a Point and Shoot Cursor Technique

       A methodology is described which allows a user to set the
mouse cursor in one place and aim it at an object in order to close
it from the desktop in a fast and convenient manner.  The object must
be visible, but does not have to be accessible in the foreground.
Furthermore, the previously disclosed methodology for test probes is
used for determining objects being pointed at.

      Normally, in a window-based graphical interface for an
operating system, excessive mouse movement is necessary in order to
close desktop objects.  This places a burden on the user because time
is spent locating windows, panels or icons, clicking on them in order
to bring them into focus, and then choosing the close menu item from
the system menu.

      The methodology described is embodied in a mechanism that
recognizes peripheral input for invoking the close function and
displaying and rotating a laser stream (i.e., a test stream prober)
from the Point&Shoot Cursor.  The stream confirms for the user that
the user is indeed aiming at what object is intended to be closed.
Hereinafter, objects refers to windows, icons, panels, etc.  This
methodology provides a technique for taking alternate paths through a
variety of media to ensure the Point&Shoot Cursor Object Close
functions expected.  The peripheral input could be from a keyboard,
mouse, or voice.  This methodology can be implemented as a utility
service for existing cursor-based applications.  The polar
coordinates are converted to corresponding Cartesian coordinates, and
passed to the existing application along with the close command.

      This is accomplished by placing the Point&Shoot Cursor Object
Close code in a device driver that interfaces with the current user
operating system.  Thus, an extra application need not be started.
Point&Shoot Cursor Object Close is invisible to the user, causing it
to act similar to a DOS Terminate and Stay Resident program.  The
code implements the close mechanism, ensuring that no application
window information is corrupted.  The driver provides a uniform end
user interface to the user.  The driver receives certain basic
information from the Point&Shoot Cursor and converts it to a uniform
standard that is used by the graphical user interface for the
operating system.

      Point&Shoot Cursor Object Close may be invoked through the
keyboard, mouse, or voice.  Each medium used has an embodiment
customary to itself.

      For example, to invoke Point&Shoot Cursor Object Close, the
user may press a specific hot key sequence (such as Ctrl+Z), click
both mouse buttons simultaneously, or enunciate the word CLOSE.  All
three would be the signal to close the object whose extent intersects
the laser stream.  Point&Shoot Cursor Object Close may be executed at
anytime.

      When a hot-key combination is pressed, Point&Shoot Cursor
Object Close intercepts t...