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Browse Prior Art Database

LAN Jam

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110329D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Blalock, JL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The capability of Midi interfaces and high fidelity digitized output are only implemented in a one-on one configuration. Existing software is limited to one performer at their workstation. This invention expands a jam session to enable multiple musicians connected by a LAN (or WAN of suitable bandwith) to work together in creating music.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 87% of the total text.

LAN Jam

       The capability of Midi interfaces and high fidelity
digitized output are only implemented in a one-on one configuration.
Existing software is limited to one performer at their workstation.
This invention expands a jam session to enable multiple musicians
connected by a LAN (or WAN of suitable bandwith) to work together in
creating music.

      Existing Midi interfaces and software allow for multiple input
to the same program. Each instrument can create its own soundtrack
using Midi technology, but all performers must be physically within
the same room.

      Extensions to current Midi sequences would allow recording of
both the live and LAN-connected performances.  Each performer would
be able to concurrently record and listen to both pre-recorded tracks
or other live input (sent over the LAN).

      The actual interaction would be similar to what happens now,
only the performers need not be physically in the same room.
ADVANTAGES
1.  Each performer can arrange their studio to fit their needs and
tastes.  They need not set up and take down multiple instruments,
cables, and frames just to move down the hall and work with another
group.
2.  Each performer can tune out for a spell, replay what has been
recorded by all performers to date, and work out an improvisation
without interrupting others who may be doing similar work
concurrently.
3.  Many more performers can work together than the largest room in
the building can hold.
4.  Obser...