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Screen Resident Pushbutton to Invoke Desktop Macro

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110337D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McKiel, FA: AUTHOR

Abstract

A means is provided to trigger a macro which acts upon other applications on the desktop, such as sorting or rearranging them. This appears as a control placed directly on the desktop and takes action when pressed rather than resizing.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 91% of the total text.

Screen Resident Pushbutton to Invoke Desktop Macro

       A means is provided to trigger a macro which acts upon
other applications on the desktop, such as sorting or rearranging
them.  This appears as a control placed directly on the desktop and
takes action when pressed rather than resizing.

      In reduction to practice, a technique has been devised within
an OS/2* Presentation Manager* (PM) environment which involves
placing a pushbutton control on the desktop among the windows and
minimized icons.  This control is actually a window created without
title bar, sizing border, system menu bar, or min/max buttons.  The
client area is filled with a single button which may be owner-drawn
or a standard PM pushbutton.  Without exposed sizing controls, the
window is always in a restored state and is receptive only to client
area messages.  It does reside on the task list so that it may be
terminated.

      This technique has been applied to triggering a macro, the
procedure for which is included in the logic of the screen-resident
button, to temporarily take control of the desktop, minimize all
applications, and arrange them in alphabetical order in rows across
the screen.  The button itself always stays in the upper left corner
of the screen.

      This approach was developed out of a need for the blind user to
have an organized desktop and to have means for repeatedly finding a
control to start the arrangement process.  The technique may have
broade...