Browse Prior Art Database

Efficient Minimize Maximize for Obscured Low Order Windows

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110354D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 113K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Consider a graphical user interface (GUI) operating system like OS/2* or Microsoft Windows** which allows n overlapped windows. Suppose a window of interest to the user is near the bottom of the Z-order, but the upper right-hand corner (containing the Min/Max buttons) is visible. If the user wishes to minimize this window, she/he clicks on the minimize button. Current art brings the window to the top of the Z-order (making it the active window). This action requires that the system do the following: 1) Paint the window to be minimized at its current size, on top of some number of formerly-higher-order overlapped windows. 2) Immediately minimize the selected window. 3) Re-paint the higher-order windows.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Efficient Minimize Maximize for Obscured Low Order Windows

       Consider a graphical user interface (GUI) operating
system like OS/2* or Microsoft Windows** which allows n overlapped
windows.  Suppose a window of interest to the user is near the bottom
of the Z-order, but the upper right-hand corner (containing the
Min/Max buttons) is visible.  If the user wishes to minimize this
window, she/he clicks on the minimize button.  Current art brings the
window to the top of the Z-order (making it the active window).  This
action requires that the system do the following:
1) Paint the window to be minimized at its current size, on top of
some number of formerly-higher-order overlapped windows.
2) Immediately minimize the selected window.
3) Re-paint the higher-order windows.

      This scheme has two major drawbacks:
1) Inefficient use of screen-painting CPU resource.
2) Potential user confusion (since a window to be minimized is
suddenly given the focus and brought to the top of the Z-order, only
to be immediately minimized anyway).

      This article describes a superior method for accomplishing
window minimization in the scenario described above.  Instead of the
above approach, the user clicks on the minimize button and the window
becomes minimized without the overhead associated with bringing it to
the top of the Z-order.

      This can be accomplished by enhancing the general process which
causes selection of any part of a window to result in bringing that
window to the top of the Z-order.  The current current process
operates similar to the following pseudo-algorithm:

                            (Image Omitted)

      A more robust approach can be logically depicted as follows:

                            (Image Omitted)

      Note that user selection of the Minimize button from a
partially-obscured low-order window is largely an exception
condition.  Therefore, the example algorithm depicted above is
structured efficiently...