Browse Prior Art Database

Signature Component Objects for Electronic Documents

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110358D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Users of pen-based tablet/notebook computers encounter a problem when utilizing such devices for signature input to important, permanent document objects. There is currently no method by which the user can specify a signature modality, such that any input generated in this mode is immutable. In addition, users need a method for electronically-signed document objects to be copied, while: 1) The original document retains unique properties. 2) The copied object contains all visible elements of the original.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Signature Component Objects for Electronic Documents

       Users of pen-based tablet/notebook computers encounter a
problem when utilizing such devices for signature input to important,
permanent document objects. There is currently no method by which the
user can specify a signature modality, such that any input generated
in this mode is immutable.  In addition, users need a method for
electronically-signed document objects to be copied, while:
  1) The original document retains unique properties.
  2) The copied object contains all visible elements of the original.

      The prior art designates removal of signature objects upon
copying the original.

      An approach is provided which allows the user to specify (to
document object creation software) a signature mode, and have a
unique attribute of this mode embedded within the document object
being created.  When invoked by the user, the mode allows
conventional pen input.  Once terminated by the user, this mode
directs the underlying software to create a new, component signature
object possessing a unique, Write-Once attribute, which can be
assigned only by an electronic pen or similarly-privileged input
device.

      The significance of this attribute is that there is no
mechanism exposed (either to the user or to application programs)
which may be used to alter or delete the input created in this mode.
Thus, the signed document possesses a characteristic of permanence.
Users may not re-enter this mode for a given signature object,
although an arbitrary number of additional signature objects may be
created.

      In contrast to prior art (in which all signatures contained in
the document object are filtered out upon copy), this approach allows
the signature component(s) to...