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Browse Prior Art Database

User Interface Architecture for Response Time Dependent Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110393D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 92K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

An architecture is described which dynamically changes user interface options and available user interface menus based on a user's response time to the active interface.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

User Interface Architecture for Response Time Dependent Control

       An architecture is described which dynamically changes
user interface options and available user interface menus based on a
user's response time to the active interface.

      Operating machinery where human lives are at stake or great
financial loss can occur requires comprehensive operator training.
For example, flight simulators exist for jets, airplanes, and the
space shuttle.  People train on simulators to ensure being prepared
for anything which may happen during an actual mission.  It is well
known that a split second of reaction time can determine what happens
to human lives and/or damage to the operated vehicle.  Simulation
technology requires a methodology which will produce different
options and outcomes in a simulated situation, derived from an
operator's response time.  There should be new options for an
operator and in many cases new options for control which are
completely dependent on response time. A methodology is needed for
revealing new user interface options and available control to a user
based on a user's response time.  An architecture is needed which
permits straight forward program development of programs for training
people through response-time dependency.

      This article describes a system architecture for dynamically
changing user interface options and available user interface menus
based on a user's response time to the active interface.  Each user
interface control and associated objects have a life cycle.  As a
user interface object (e.g., menu, panel, icon) is spawned to a
computer interface desktop, it has a life cycle equivalent to the
time it will remain accessible for use.  When an object's life has
expired, there are varieties of death.  For example, death may take
the following forms: 1) Object remains on desktop and is stagnant
(i.e., cannot be used, closed, discarded or acted upon in any way
until reboot).  2) Obj...