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Browse Prior Art Database

Many Dimensional Visualization Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110422D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 149K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rabenhorst, DA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of simultaneously displaying up to nine or more dimensions of data on a computer graphics screen. The resolution along each dimension is coarse, but nevertheless sufficient to draw multi-dimensional conclusions. Equipment to do three-dimensional stereoscopic graphics is not required, but may optionally be used to further enhance effectiveness. Time-varying animation is not required, but could be used to encode a tenth dimension of data.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Many Dimensional Visualization Technique

       Disclosed is a method of simultaneously displaying up to
nine or more dimensions of data on a computer graphics screen.  The
resolution along each dimension is coarse, but nevertheless
sufficient to draw multi-dimensional conclusions.  Equipment to do
three-dimensional stereoscopic graphics is not required, but may
optionally be used to further enhance effectiveness.  Time-varying
animation is not required, but could be used to encode a tenth
dimension of data.

      The many-dimensional visualization technique involves
displaying a 3-dimensional scatter plot of special glyphs along
cellularized spatial axes, as shown in the figure.  Any three of the
data dimensions may be mapped to the three spatial dimensions x, y,
and z.  Any of the remaining data dimensions may be mapped to any of
several other displayable attributes.

      All of the data points are partitioned into the cells along the
three spatial dimensions.  For simplicity, the same number of cells
equally divides the range of values along each spatial dimension
(though this is not absolutely necessary).  The number of cells along
each spatial dimension is a settable parameter.

      Within each cell, the population of data points is counted, and
the means and variations among them is computed.  Variation is the
root mean square of the standard deviations of the values of all the
currently mapped variables of all the data points populating a cell.
The population and variation parameters are called derived variables.
They are very important, because they are artifacts of the
quantification along the spatial dimensions.  The derived variables
may also be mapped to any of the displayable attributes.

      Within each cell of the plot, a special 3-dimensional glyph may
be displayed.  The glyphs are designed to permit the independent
display of six additional attributes without interference.  A glyph
is actually a rectangular solid with a rectangular hole going all the
way through one axis.  The two faces of the glyph at the ends of the
hole are distinguished -- the front side is brighter than the dark
side.

      The hole distinguishes one of the axes, permitting the length
which is parallel to the hole to be parameterized as an independently
displayable attribute.  This is called glyph thickness.  The glyph
thickness can be varied between zero and the full size of the cell,
according to the normalized values of any one of the variables.

      The narrowness of the opening of the hole can also be
parameterized as an independently displayable attribute.  This is
called glyph fullness.  The glyph fullness can be varied between zero
(a hollow tube with very narrow walls), and complete (where the hole
is completely filled in) accordi...