Browse Prior Art Database

Air Cooled Heat Sinks with Flow Diverters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000110465D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hatsios, JG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a heat sink using diverters in the air channels for boosting its cooling capability. The heat sink is constructed by interleaving thin metal plates with spacers. The metal plates and spacers are brazed or welded together. The cross-sectional view of an air channel is shown in Fig. 1. The air channel is formed on a metal plate 11 with bottom and top spacers 13 and 14. Heat is preferred coming in from the surface created by the plate 11 and the bottom spacer 13. A tapered entrance is produced by the angled cut 12 on the bottom and top spacers 13 and 14. There is a diverter 15 inserted from the top in angles near the channel exit 16. The arrows 17 indicate the flow path of air in the channel. The direction of the air flow can be reversed.

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Air Cooled Heat Sinks with Flow Diverters

      Disclosed is a heat sink using diverters in the air channels
for boosting its cooling capability.  The heat sink is constructed by
interleaving thin metal plates with spacers.  The metal plates and
spacers are brazed or welded together.  The cross-sectional view of
an air channel is shown in Fig. 1.  The air channel is formed on a
metal plate 11 with bottom and top spacers 13 and 14.  Heat is
preferred coming in from the surface created by the plate 11 and the
bottom spacer 13.  A tapered entrance is produced by the angled cut
12 on the bottom and top spacers 13 and 14.  There is a diverter 15
inserted from the top in angles near the channel exit 16.  The arrows
17 indicate the flow path of air in the channel.  The direction of
the air flow can be reversed.  Both the diverter 15 and the extruded
portion of bottom spacer 13 control the air flow.  The diverter 15
can be integrated with the top spacer 14 as shown in Fig. 2.  The
part 18 is a diverter except that its shape is more aerodynamically
efficient.  Furthermore, the extruded portion of the bottom spacer is
extended all the way to the channel exit 16.  Finally, the concept
illustrated here is applicable to other fluids as well.

      Disclosed anonymously.